1. Finally! A sequel that exceeds its precursor. The now long list of Xmen films offer up a wide range of what is both good and bad about cinema.

I suppose I should have seen this coming. From its restraint marketing campaign up until three weeks ago with a single trailer, scattered context-less photos on the Internet, and film posters.

What we will be in the future is the product of our efforts, actions, and decisions we do today.  This comes to mind as I watched the movie. It may have implied that our decisions matter. The movie was an eye opener. If you’ll look at it in deeper meaning, you’ll see how our mistake affect the future. 

The film is both more progressed but more confounding than its precursor since it requires full attention but it’s equally rewarding.

I immediately got hooked by the blast of fight scenes that shows survival tests for both species across two time periods. And the idea of setting a very high momentum can be quite dangerous but I was amazed that director, Bryan Singer surpassed it until the end. Emotionally, the story, actors, and scenes take you to a place you never thought it could go.

The appealing characters from the original X-Men film trilogy, Wolverine, Mystique, Bolivar Trask, Professor X, Magneto, Rogue, Storm, Blink, Kitty Pryde, Colossus, Beast, Warpath, Iceman, and William Stryker joined forces with their young selves from X-Men: First Class in a great epic battle to change the past and save the dying future.

The mash-up of X-Men past and future for me has the prospective to be the finest superhero blockbuster this generation will ever see. The Xmen sent Wolverine from future to the past in a desperate effort to change history and prevent an event that results in doom for both humans and mutants.

Hugh Jackman, who seems to be the face of the Xmen delivers with his dry sense of humor. Jennifer Lawrence is more a focus in this one which makes sense (she’s the IT girl of today, and makes a lot of money). However, James MaCavoy steals the show as the one and only Professor Charles Xavier with a great performance you’ll never see coming. Not to exclude the rest of the cast, this rivals The Dark Knight franchise with a thriller like mentality that you won’t want to miss on the big screen.

Every element is balanced. Even the soundtrack is fitting. The cinematography in itself was excellent. Over all, it was entertaining and a significant Xmen movie.
I walked away from the film very satisfied but let us hope that this is not the last we see of the Xmen on our screens.

    Finally! A sequel that exceeds its precursor. The now long list of Xmen films offer up a wide range of what is both good and bad about cinema.

    I suppose I should have seen this coming. From its restraint marketing campaign up until three weeks ago with a single trailer, scattered context-less photos on the Internet, and film posters.

    What we will be in the future is the product of our efforts, actions, and decisions we do today.  This comes to mind as I watched the movie. It may have implied that our decisions matter. The movie was an eye opener. If you’ll look at it in deeper meaning, you’ll see how our mistake affect the future.

    The film is both more progressed but more confounding than its precursor since it requires full attention but it’s equally rewarding.

    I immediately got hooked by the blast of fight scenes that shows survival tests for both species across two time periods. And the idea of setting a very high momentum can be quite dangerous but I was amazed that director, Bryan Singer surpassed it until the end. Emotionally, the story, actors, and scenes take you to a place you never thought it could go.

    The appealing characters from the original X-Men film trilogy, Wolverine, Mystique, Bolivar Trask, Professor X, Magneto, Rogue, Storm, Blink, Kitty Pryde, Colossus, Beast, Warpath, Iceman, and William Stryker joined forces with their young selves from X-Men: First Class in a great epic battle to change the past and save the dying future.

    The mash-up of X-Men past and future for me has the prospective to be the finest superhero blockbuster this generation will ever see. The Xmen sent Wolverine from future to the past in a desperate effort to change history and prevent an event that results in doom for both humans and mutants.

    Hugh Jackman, who seems to be the face of the Xmen delivers with his dry sense of humor. Jennifer Lawrence is more a focus in this one which makes sense (she’s the IT girl of today, and makes a lot of money). However, James MaCavoy steals the show as the one and only Professor Charles Xavier with a great performance you’ll never see coming. Not to exclude the rest of the cast, this rivals The Dark Knight franchise with a thriller like mentality that you won’t want to miss on the big screen.

    Every element is balanced. Even the soundtrack is fitting. The cinematography in itself was excellent. Over all, it was entertaining and a significant Xmen movie.

    I walked away from the film very satisfied but let us hope that this is not the last we see of the Xmen on our screens.

    photo

    Jun 29 9:45AM
  2. The ‘Avengers’ fans need to relax their horns and not throw in their precipitated soliloquies because this is a Spiderman’s underscored movie review. Even if Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.) has a front-line test bed, Peter Parker (Andrew Garfield) has Gwen Stacey (Emma Stone), and that’s more than enough on top of being masticated by a gay spider. 

Most of today’s comic book movies are so busy with bad one liners and surges of repetitive action sequences that they forget to do one of the most important aspects of film, tell a compelling story. And Marc Webb’s Amazing Spiderman reboot does it good. 
In this installment, Parker is still refining his superhero built but a top view of his tight ass afore the jump and web retrospective is bracingly acceptable. (In fact, I could get use to that.) 

While many find his compactness confusing, he’s the most human among all Marvel prodigies: his disorientation due to his confounded parents who left train passes as hint of only self; his battle between love and welfare; his jiffies with his father-in-law’s ghost; his susceptibility to a suitcase; his penchant for Phillip Phillips; and his arguments with his aunt are what make him accessibly relevant.
Plus, the clever romantic tale carefully injected in the story amidst the sundry CGI effects and live-action imagery, and incredibly thin script, is too convincing not to be able to connect and dive in thoughts. 

The break-up at the restaurant was a definitive way to reveal a real and working relationship between Stacey, Parker, and the superhero in him, inflamed by a haunting promise. It’s understandably complicated.
Nowadays, life doesn’t seem to be smooth for superheroes–with public veto and his own life not being easy either, good thing, Parker manages to retain his sense of humor.
The action is great when it happens, with a nice musical score as accompaniment. There are myriad implausible events–how almost every accident seems to result in a superhero. Of how no government agency ever lands despite several creatures springing up and devastating NYC, instead leaving everything to Oscorp to clean the mess up? 

But yeah, this is just minor stuff to sweat on a ride not as thrilling as Jamie Foxx’s transition from a nerdy unseen scientist (with a worse comb-over than Miley Cyrus’ locks) to Electro smurf who’s hard to say how much is his fault, and how fast he became the super-villain. 

Providing the movie with most of its laughs, charm, and in some parts, genuine tears, the blend of action and ambiguity makes for a piquant beer–one that you don’t want to stop gulping.


P.S. In a truly heart-wrenching moment, Stacey died when she tragically hits the ground one second before Spiderman’s web can reach her, and like Parker, I would have broken down in tears and wailed, “Stay with me! Stay with me!”
Also, stay put in your seat during the end credits because there’s an X-men surprise at the end.
There’s a tease for “The Amazing Spider-Man 3,” with Jennifer Lawrence as Mystique from the X-Men films.

    The ‘Avengers’ fans need to relax their horns and not throw in their precipitated soliloquies because this is a Spiderman’s underscored movie review. Even if Tony Stark (Robert Downey, Jr.) has a front-line test bed, Peter Parker (Andrew Garfield) has Gwen Stacey (Emma Stone), and that’s more than enough on top of being masticated by a gay spider. 

    image

    Most of today’s comic book movies are so busy with bad one liners and surges of repetitive action sequences that they forget to do one of the most important aspects of film, tell a compelling story. And Marc Webb’s Amazing Spiderman reboot does it good. 

    In this installment, Parker is still refining his superhero built but a top view of his tight ass afore the jump and web retrospective is bracingly acceptable. (In fact, I could get use to that.) 

    image

    While many find his compactness confusing, he’s the most human among all Marvel prodigies: his disorientation due to his confounded parents who left train passes as hint of only self; his battle between love and welfare; his jiffies with his father-in-law’s ghost; his susceptibility to a suitcase; his penchant for Phillip Phillips; and his arguments with his aunt are what make him accessibly relevant.

    Plus, the clever romantic tale carefully injected in the story amidst the sundry CGI effects and live-action imagery, and incredibly thin script, is too convincing not to be able to connect and dive in thoughts. 

    imageimage

    The break-up at the restaurant was a definitive way to reveal a real and working relationship between Stacey, Parker, and the superhero in him, inflamed by a haunting promise. It’s understandably complicated.

    Nowadays, life doesn’t seem to be smooth for superheroes–with public veto and his own life not being easy either, good thing, Parker manages to retain his sense of humor.

    The action is great when it happens, with a nice musical score as accompaniment. There are myriad implausible events–how almost every accident seems to result in a superhero. Of how no government agency ever lands despite several creatures springing up and devastating NYC, instead leaving everything to Oscorp to clean the mess up? 

    image

    But yeah, this is just minor stuff to sweat on a ride not as thrilling as Jamie Foxx’s transition from a nerdy unseen scientist (with a worse comb-over than Miley Cyrus’ locks) to Electro smurf who’s hard to say how much is his fault, and how fast he became the super-villain. 

    image

    Providing the movie with most of its laughs, charm, and in some parts, genuine tears, the blend of action and ambiguity makes for a piquant beer–one that you don’t want to stop gulping.

    imageimageimage

    P.S. In a truly heart-wrenching moment, Stacey died when she tragically hits the ground one second before Spiderman’s web can reach her, and like Parker, I would have broken down in tears and wailed, “Stay with me! Stay with me!”

    Also, stay put in your seat during the end credits because there’s an X-men surprise at the end.

    There’s a tease for “The Amazing Spider-Man 3,” with Jennifer Lawrence as Mystique from the X-Men films.

    photo

    5 notes
  3. Putting my turbulent Monday to good use, I finally had made a review of one of the much antedated horror movies of 2013, "The Conjuring". That is an understatement; I have been waiting for a film in the paranormal genre as good as this since Insidious, 2010.




The Warren files are infamous and this take on their Rhode Island case is utterly terrifying. I have to admit I do not believe in any other ‘higher force’ i.e. gods, demons, ghosts but this movie left me in such an uncomfortable state – literally shaking, yet weirdly laughing at some point.


When I say that, I’m not lying. It really got me! The scenes are not too far-fetched where paranormal activity is concerned and the ghostly characters aren’t overly unbelievable; not under-cooked but not overdone; a Goldilocks of a film. The technique of letting the audience sweat with tension is done perfectly.


The actors themselves provide faultless performances and even to the extent that you, as the audience, believe you’re watching a documentary with original footage.



The acting in this horror film is superb, and I strongly believe that the ability to pretend to be scared, possessed, and disturbed is a difficult talent to achieve.
The Warrens, Lorraine (Vera Farmiga) and Ed (Patrick Wilson) are portrayed so well, I can only imagine the real Lorraine Warren will be more than satisfied with their portrayal.
'James Wan is a saint' - a statement completely proven by the film.
It’s in my top 3 of scariest films of all time and by far it is my favorite in this ever-growing ‘ghost hunter’ genre.
    Putting my turbulent Monday to good use, I finally had made a review of one of the much antedated horror movies of 2013, "The Conjuring". That is an understatement; I have been waiting for a film in the paranormal genre as good as this since Insidious, 2010.
    imageimage
    The Warren files are infamous and this take on their Rhode Island case is utterly terrifying. I have to admit I do not believe in any other ‘higher force’ i.e. gods, demons, ghosts but this movie left me in such an uncomfortable state – literally shaking, yet weirdly laughing at some point.
    When I say that, I’m not lying. It really got me! The scenes are not too far-fetched where paranormal activity is concerned and the ghostly characters aren’t overly unbelievable; not under-cooked but not overdone; a Goldilocks of a film. The technique of letting the audience sweat with tension is done perfectly.
    The actors themselves provide faultless performances and even to the extent that you, as the audience, believe you’re watching a documentary with original footage.
    imageimage
    imageimageimageimage

    The acting in this horror film is superb, and I strongly believe that the ability to pretend to be scared, possessed, and disturbed is a difficult talent to achieve.

    The Warrens, Lorraine (Vera Farmiga) and Ed (Patrick Wilson) are portrayed so well, I can only imagine the real Lorraine Warren will be more than satisfied with their portrayal.imageimageimage

    'James Wan is a saint' - a statement completely proven by the film.

    It’s in my top 3 of scariest films of all time and by far it is my favorite in this ever-growing ‘ghost hunter’ genre.

    photo

    9 notes
  4. As I’ve mentioned a day or 2 ago, I managed to flash- download a bulk of films and documentaries, and I happened to like Pure Heart the most among the rest. Though I still have 3 more films yet unwatched, and are waiting for the night.
Frontier Works, a Japanese publisher, took the enterprise to create a live-action film adaptation of Hyouta Fujiyama’s Pure Heart (Junjō) boys-love manga, with Satoshi Kaneda as the director . According to them, the story of the film is somehow different and mixt from the original three-volume manga series and the two drama anime CDs.
However, I feel that the female fans of yaoi manga, romantic homoerotic stories, and online/fan fiction might be motivated by the same voyeuristic pleasure than men get thinking about lesbians. Nevertheless, Kobayashi’s script will be taking liberties with the love story as told in Fujiyama’s original composition.
Rakuto Tochihara (who was real effective the entire film due to his amiable expressions) portrayed a writer named Tozaki who after many years, crossed paths with his high school crush named Kurata, played by Yuta Takahashi (who was radiating with sex appeal, despite his lankiness). Their reunion was followed by drinks, and the stirring of old feelings.

    As I’ve mentioned a day or 2 ago, I managed to flash- download a bulk of films and documentaries, and I happened to like Pure Heart the most among the rest. Though I still have 3 more films yet unwatched, and are waiting for the night.

    Frontier Works, a Japanese publisher, took the enterprise to create a live-action film adaptation of Hyouta Fujiyama’s Pure Heart (Junjō) boys-love manga, with Satoshi Kaneda as the director . According to them, the story of the film is somehow different and mixt from the original three-volume manga series and the two drama anime CDs.

    However, I feel that the female fans of yaoi manga, romantic homoerotic stories, and online/fan fiction might be motivated by the same voyeuristic pleasure than men get thinking about lesbians. Nevertheless, Kobayashi’s script will be taking liberties with the love story as told in Fujiyama’s original composition.

    imageRakuto Tochihara (who was real effective the entire film due to his amiable expressions) portrayed a writer named Tozaki who after many years, crossed paths with his high school crush named Kurata, played by Yuta Takahashi (who was radiating with sex appeal, despite his lankiness). Their reunion was followed by drinks, and the stirring of old feelings.

    imageimageimage



    photo

    5 notes
  5. 
Written and directed by James Brooks, Spanglish feels like a casual misogynist psychodrama rather than a comedic one. Though the characters’ performances and pleasure are difficult to negate, the film felt short because of its complexity. Yes, the story is all about a Mexican mother with her daughter who traveled to Los Angeles to bring sanity to another family and that it focuses on imperfect union of two different worlds, but the narrative is undeniably less a story than a picture of a sitcom-y crumbling marriage populated by just good actors which makes it, at the end, an intriguing and a surprisingly heartfelt tale.
Consider Deborah Clasky, the English mother, who has forgotten to breathe because all she did was shout, scream, blather, sigh, trot and complain about many things. She may be politically correct and clever but her life is besieged by one crisis after another. I’m not sure this character has any relation to a possible human being, but as an observable fact, it’s kind of amazing.
Her husband John Clasky, the finest chef in America according to the New York Times, is played by Adam Sandler. One would suppose that his character would be as comical as his other film roles but he wasn’t, because he remained truthful. The performance was laid back and all natural.
Evelyn in contrast is a pro- alcoholic mad woman whose rehearsals start at noon. Her drinking paid off in the last act when she gave her daughter urgent advice which did make sense and had established that her character is far amusing than ignorance.
Into this household, then, came Flor and her daughter Cristina who were 6- year residents of a particular barrio and have now ventured into a foreign land to earn. The story is narrated by the daughter as an affectionate memory of her mother who learned English to treat this needful family with massive doses of common sense.
As the film masquerades a heartfelt social commentary on life, the focal point becomes vague because the message was unclear. Is it about Flor or about the Claskys’ marriage or about the way the two daughters (both smart and both sane) are the go-to members of their families? I’m not sure that there’s a good story line here because it’s as if all these people have met, mixed, behaved and almost had lost their happiness at the same time before everything is restored and that the movie can end.
My favorite scene involves a sequence where Flor decided to finally explain to the Claskys exactly what she thinks and why. At this point, she still speaks no English and so Cristina, her daughter, acts as her translator, shadow and mime. Their virtuoso comic timing was superb. There’s also an ironic dialogue concerning the Times review of John’s restaurant, which to John was a catastrophe. It made me smirk when he said, “Please Lord. Just give me three and a quarter stars.” Such a deep statement!
The film has something to say about the art of belonging, whether it’s within a loving family or the often painful American class structure.
From my point of view, “Self-realization is essential. After all, the world is crazier than what we could have imagined.”

    Written and directed by James Brooks, Spanglish feels like a casual misogynist psychodrama rather than a comedic one. Though the characters’ performances and pleasure are difficult to negate, the film felt short because of its complexity. Yes, the story is all about a Mexican mother with her daughter who traveled to Los Angeles to bring sanity to another family and that it focuses on imperfect union of two different worlds, but the narrative is undeniably less a story than a picture of a sitcom-y crumbling marriage populated by just good actors which makes it, at the end, an intriguing and a surprisingly heartfelt tale.

    Consider Deborah Clasky, the English mother, who has forgotten to breathe because all she did was shout, scream, blather, sigh, trot and complain about many things. She may be politically correct and clever but her life is besieged by one crisis after another. I’m not sure this character has any relation to a possible human being, but as an observable fact, it’s kind of amazing.

    Her husband John Clasky, the finest chef in America according to the New York Times, is played by Adam Sandler. One would suppose that his character would be as comical as his other film roles but he wasn’t, because he remained truthful. The performance was laid back and all natural.

    Evelyn in contrast is a pro- alcoholic mad woman whose rehearsals start at noon. Her drinking paid off in the last act when she gave her daughter urgent advice which did make sense and had established that her character is far amusing than ignorance.

    Into this household, then, came Flor and her daughter Cristina who were 6- year residents of a particular barrio and have now ventured into a foreign land to earn. The story is narrated by the daughter as an affectionate memory of her mother who learned English to treat this needful family with massive doses of common sense.

    As the film masquerades a heartfelt social commentary on life, the focal point becomes vague because the message was unclear. Is it about Flor or about the Claskys’ marriage or about the way the two daughters (both smart and both sane) are the go-to members of their families? I’m not sure that there’s a good story line here because it’s as if all these people have met, mixed, behaved and almost had lost their happiness at the same time before everything is restored and that the movie can end.

    My favorite scene involves a sequence where Flor decided to finally explain to the Claskys exactly what she thinks and why. At this point, she still speaks no English and so Cristina, her daughter, acts as her translator, shadow and mime. Their virtuoso comic timing was superb. There’s also an ironic dialogue concerning the Times review of John’s restaurant, which to John was a catastrophe. It made me smirk when he said, “Please Lord. Just give me three and a quarter stars.” Such a deep statement!

    The film has something to say about the art of belonging, whether it’s within a loving family or the often painful American class structure.

    From my point of view, “Self-realization is essential. After all, the world is crazier than what we could have imagined.”

    photo

    5 notes