1. Putting my turbulent Monday to good use, I finally had made a review of one of the much antedated horror movies of 2013, "The Conjuring". That is an understatement; I have been waiting for a film in the paranormal genre as good as this since Insidious, 2010.




The Warren files are infamous and this take on their Rhode Island case is utterly terrifying. I have to admit I do not believe in any other ‘higher force’ i.e. gods, demons, ghosts but this movie left me in such an uncomfortable state – literally shaking, yet weirdly laughing at some point.


When I say that, I’m not lying. It really got me! The scenes are not too far-fetched where paranormal activity is concerned and the ghostly characters aren’t overly unbelievable; not under-cooked but not overdone; a Goldilocks of a film. The technique of letting the audience sweat with tension is done perfectly.


The actors themselves provide faultless performances and even to the extent that you, as the audience, believe you’re watching a documentary with original footage.



The acting in this horror film is superb, and I strongly believe that the ability to pretend to be scared, possessed, and disturbed is a difficult talent to achieve.
The Warrens, Lorraine (Vera Farmiga) and Ed (Patrick Wilson) are portrayed so well, I can only imagine the real Lorraine Warren will be more than satisfied with their portrayal.
'James Wan is a saint' - a statement completely proven by the film.
It’s in my top 3 of scariest films of all time and by far it is my favorite in this ever-growing ‘ghost hunter’ genre.
    Putting my turbulent Monday to good use, I finally had made a review of one of the much antedated horror movies of 2013, "The Conjuring". That is an understatement; I have been waiting for a film in the paranormal genre as good as this since Insidious, 2010.
    imageimage
    The Warren files are infamous and this take on their Rhode Island case is utterly terrifying. I have to admit I do not believe in any other ‘higher force’ i.e. gods, demons, ghosts but this movie left me in such an uncomfortable state – literally shaking, yet weirdly laughing at some point.
    When I say that, I’m not lying. It really got me! The scenes are not too far-fetched where paranormal activity is concerned and the ghostly characters aren’t overly unbelievable; not under-cooked but not overdone; a Goldilocks of a film. The technique of letting the audience sweat with tension is done perfectly.
    The actors themselves provide faultless performances and even to the extent that you, as the audience, believe you’re watching a documentary with original footage.
    imageimage
    imageimageimageimage

    The acting in this horror film is superb, and I strongly believe that the ability to pretend to be scared, possessed, and disturbed is a difficult talent to achieve.

    The Warrens, Lorraine (Vera Farmiga) and Ed (Patrick Wilson) are portrayed so well, I can only imagine the real Lorraine Warren will be more than satisfied with their portrayal.imageimageimage

    'James Wan is a saint' - a statement completely proven by the film.

    It’s in my top 3 of scariest films of all time and by far it is my favorite in this ever-growing ‘ghost hunter’ genre.

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    9 notes
  2. As I’ve mentioned a day or 2 ago, I managed to flash- download a bulk of films and documentaries, and I happened to like Pure Heart the most among the rest. Though I still have 3 more films yet unwatched, and are waiting for the night.
Frontier Works, a Japanese publisher, took the enterprise to create a live-action film adaptation of Hyouta Fujiyama’s Pure Heart (Junjō) boys-love manga, with Satoshi Kaneda as the director . According to them, the story of the film is somehow different and mixt from the original three-volume manga series and the two drama anime CDs.
However, I feel that the female fans of yaoi manga, romantic homoerotic stories, and online/fan fiction might be motivated by the same voyeuristic pleasure than men get thinking about lesbians. Nevertheless, Kobayashi’s script will be taking liberties with the love story as told in Fujiyama’s original composition.
Rakuto Tochihara (who was real effective the entire film due to his amiable expressions) portrayed a writer named Tozaki who after many years, crossed paths with his high school crush named Kurata, played by Yuta Takahashi (who was radiating with sex appeal, despite his lankiness). Their reunion was followed by drinks, and the stirring of old feelings.

    As I’ve mentioned a day or 2 ago, I managed to flash- download a bulk of films and documentaries, and I happened to like Pure Heart the most among the rest. Though I still have 3 more films yet unwatched, and are waiting for the night.

    Frontier Works, a Japanese publisher, took the enterprise to create a live-action film adaptation of Hyouta Fujiyama’s Pure Heart (Junjō) boys-love manga, with Satoshi Kaneda as the director . According to them, the story of the film is somehow different and mixt from the original three-volume manga series and the two drama anime CDs.

    However, I feel that the female fans of yaoi manga, romantic homoerotic stories, and online/fan fiction might be motivated by the same voyeuristic pleasure than men get thinking about lesbians. Nevertheless, Kobayashi’s script will be taking liberties with the love story as told in Fujiyama’s original composition.

    imageRakuto Tochihara (who was real effective the entire film due to his amiable expressions) portrayed a writer named Tozaki who after many years, crossed paths with his high school crush named Kurata, played by Yuta Takahashi (who was radiating with sex appeal, despite his lankiness). Their reunion was followed by drinks, and the stirring of old feelings.

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    5 notes
  3. 
Written and directed by James Brooks, Spanglish feels like a casual misogynist psychodrama rather than a comedic one. Though the characters’ performances and pleasure are difficult to negate, the film felt short because of its complexity. Yes, the story is all about a Mexican mother with her daughter who traveled to Los Angeles to bring sanity to another family and that it focuses on imperfect union of two different worlds, but the narrative is undeniably less a story than a picture of a sitcom-y crumbling marriage populated by just good actors which makes it, at the end, an intriguing and a surprisingly heartfelt tale.
Consider Deborah Clasky, the English mother, who has forgotten to breathe because all she did was shout, scream, blather, sigh, trot and complain about many things. She may be politically correct and clever but her life is besieged by one crisis after another. I’m not sure this character has any relation to a possible human being, but as an observable fact, it’s kind of amazing.
Her husband John Clasky, the finest chef in America according to the New York Times, is played by Adam Sandler. One would suppose that his character would be as comical as his other film roles but he wasn’t, because he remained truthful. The performance was laid back and all natural.
Evelyn in contrast is a pro- alcoholic mad woman whose rehearsals start at noon. Her drinking paid off in the last act when she gave her daughter urgent advice which did make sense and had established that her character is far amusing than ignorance.
Into this household, then, came Flor and her daughter Cristina who were 6- year residents of a particular barrio and have now ventured into a foreign land to earn. The story is narrated by the daughter as an affectionate memory of her mother who learned English to treat this needful family with massive doses of common sense.
As the film masquerades a heartfelt social commentary on life, the focal point becomes vague because the message was unclear. Is it about Flor or about the Claskys’ marriage or about the way the two daughters (both smart and both sane) are the go-to members of their families? I’m not sure that there’s a good story line here because it’s as if all these people have met, mixed, behaved and almost had lost their happiness at the same time before everything is restored and that the movie can end.
My favorite scene involves a sequence where Flor decided to finally explain to the Claskys exactly what she thinks and why. At this point, she still speaks no English and so Cristina, her daughter, acts as her translator, shadow and mime. Their virtuoso comic timing was superb. There’s also an ironic dialogue concerning the Times review of John’s restaurant, which to John was a catastrophe. It made me smirk when he said, “Please Lord. Just give me three and a quarter stars.” Such a deep statement!
The film has something to say about the art of belonging, whether it’s within a loving family or the often painful American class structure.
From my point of view, “Self-realization is essential. After all, the world is crazier than what we could have imagined.”

    Written and directed by James Brooks, Spanglish feels like a casual misogynist psychodrama rather than a comedic one. Though the characters’ performances and pleasure are difficult to negate, the film felt short because of its complexity. Yes, the story is all about a Mexican mother with her daughter who traveled to Los Angeles to bring sanity to another family and that it focuses on imperfect union of two different worlds, but the narrative is undeniably less a story than a picture of a sitcom-y crumbling marriage populated by just good actors which makes it, at the end, an intriguing and a surprisingly heartfelt tale.

    Consider Deborah Clasky, the English mother, who has forgotten to breathe because all she did was shout, scream, blather, sigh, trot and complain about many things. She may be politically correct and clever but her life is besieged by one crisis after another. I’m not sure this character has any relation to a possible human being, but as an observable fact, it’s kind of amazing.

    Her husband John Clasky, the finest chef in America according to the New York Times, is played by Adam Sandler. One would suppose that his character would be as comical as his other film roles but he wasn’t, because he remained truthful. The performance was laid back and all natural.

    Evelyn in contrast is a pro- alcoholic mad woman whose rehearsals start at noon. Her drinking paid off in the last act when she gave her daughter urgent advice which did make sense and had established that her character is far amusing than ignorance.

    Into this household, then, came Flor and her daughter Cristina who were 6- year residents of a particular barrio and have now ventured into a foreign land to earn. The story is narrated by the daughter as an affectionate memory of her mother who learned English to treat this needful family with massive doses of common sense.

    As the film masquerades a heartfelt social commentary on life, the focal point becomes vague because the message was unclear. Is it about Flor or about the Claskys’ marriage or about the way the two daughters (both smart and both sane) are the go-to members of their families? I’m not sure that there’s a good story line here because it’s as if all these people have met, mixed, behaved and almost had lost their happiness at the same time before everything is restored and that the movie can end.

    My favorite scene involves a sequence where Flor decided to finally explain to the Claskys exactly what she thinks and why. At this point, she still speaks no English and so Cristina, her daughter, acts as her translator, shadow and mime. Their virtuoso comic timing was superb. There’s also an ironic dialogue concerning the Times review of John’s restaurant, which to John was a catastrophe. It made me smirk when he said, “Please Lord. Just give me three and a quarter stars.” Such a deep statement!

    The film has something to say about the art of belonging, whether it’s within a loving family or the often painful American class structure.

    From my point of view, “Self-realization is essential. After all, the world is crazier than what we could have imagined.”

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    5 notes
  4. An English man is sent to Sarawak to become part of the British rule, encounters profane local customs and had confronted with tough decisions of the heart, involving Selima who is a Sleeping Dictionary (a concubine to share a man’s bed, have sex and teach him the local language) and the unconscious object for his affections.
This love story with a ‘work-of-geniusvibe’ lays bare the sexual treachery that underlies an English colony somewhere in Malaysia. Any one who thinks filmmakers have stopped creating outlandish romance about sexually repressed heroes in white flannels and differently speaking native women in sarongs need look no further than this film for evidence to the contrary. So given that the production is culture- concerned and historical on its own, who would not want to jump in and enjoy this impeccably produced bit of insolence when the wandering storyline is as scandalous as its title? 
I have been an adherent of Hugh Dancy from his movie roles in “The Confessions of a Shopaholic”, “King Arthur”, “Ella Enchanted” and “Savage Grace”. But this one is far exceptional. Most of his acts were provoking and witty and though I did see the challenge in him to portray the odd role, he effortlessly managed to without being malevolent. His delivery and packful of emotions are guaranteed plus to grasping sensitive investments towards the character and the story. These exact words as told by his character in the film, “Then I’ll tell them I’d rather have you than a country… or a language… or a history.” will surely melt any woman’s heart.
Jessica Alba was never new to me. She has always captured the press and filmmakers’ attention because of her superb acting and exotic beauty. In the film, to and fugitive couple through the jungle; violence and emotional blackmail threaten the couple’s desperate efforts to recapture their brief happiness.



    An English man is sent to Sarawak to become part of the British rule, encounters profane local customs and had confronted with tough decisions of the heart, involving Selima who is a Sleeping Dictionary (a concubine to share a man’s bed, have sex and teach him the local language) and the unconscious object for his affections.

    This love story with a ‘work-of-geniusvibe’ lays bare the sexual treachery that underlies an English colony somewhere in Malaysia. Any one who thinks filmmakers have stopped creating outlandish romance about sexually repressed heroes in white flannels and differently speaking native women in sarongs need look no further than this film for evidence to the contrary. So given that the production is culture- concerned and historical on its own, who would not want to jump in and enjoy this impeccably produced bit of insolence when the wandering storyline is as scandalous as its title? 

    I have been an adherent of Hugh Dancy from his movie roles in “The Confessions of a Shopaholic”, “King Arthur”, “Ella Enchanted” and “Savage Grace”. But this one is far exceptional. Most of his acts were provoking and witty and though I did see the challenge in him to portray the odd role, he effortlessly managed to without being malevolent. His delivery and packful of emotions are guaranteed plus to grasping sensitive investments towards the character and the story. These exact words as told by his character in the film, Then I’ll tell them I’d rather have you than a country… or a language… or a history.” will surely melt any woman’s heart.

    Jessica Alba was never new to me. She has always captured the press and filmmakers’ attention because of her superb acting and exotic beauty. In the film, to and fugitive couple through the jungle; violence and emotional blackmail threaten the couple’s desperate efforts to recapture their brief happiness.

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  5. Scorpio Nights 1 & 2: Comparative Criticism

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    Film critics say that they’re objective and disconnected to whatever meat there is on the grill, but for me, it isn’t true at all because everyone has his prejudices, preferences and blind spots.  The best way to get by one’s biases is possibly the only way to deal with them, ironically. Talking about prejudices, I was faced with two Filipino sex films. One had profound characterization that the other lacks. One was tamed and the other; vulgar, raw, exciting and will make you pant and kneel.

    “You grasp your armrest while the lovers screw under God’s nose; you hold your breath while they reel on the brink of dangerous. Sex takes on the air of exciting boldness, of rebellion. They’re literally fucking in the face of death itself.” This is what this phase is introducing - words in rhythm, compelling, tasteful and hard core but both films were able to offer, amid the graveness of sex scenes, justice – to instill in peoples’ minds the fundamental nature of policy, discrimination and Filipino culture.

    Peque Gallaga’s Scorpio Nights is stapled on triangular love – customary in any Filipino household, and yet his work of art is twisted in many aspects. The story is about a student who’s staying on a decaying apartment and below his room lived a security guard and next of kin. A peephole detaches the two worlds – not different though. Everything happened because of lust and consciousness of an impatient, young mind towards sex. 

    It’s an audacious premise, a coup de theatre that, if you can accept it, prepares you for more audacious stuff to follow. Almost the entire film was set in one place and somehow, in that cramped little space, Gallaga’s prodigious visual imagination exploded. He threw in every camera move and lighting trick he possibly knew. I loved how the camera almost never wandered outside the gate of the premise because it brought this focus on the microcosmic lives of the people inside. He staged every sexual encounter like a stunt or an action sequence where no sex act was too perverse, no visual touch too baroque or excessive. He directs with an astonishing urgency. I’d also like to mention the scene where the wife was giving up her ghost and Orestes started weeping while into her profundity. That’s maybe the subtlest bit of storytelling Peque has done to insert a good drama. Although there we’re some kitschy sequence in the film (the rain shots with lovers in cellophane, complete with Jaime Fabregas’ tacky music), it still fed my hunger for truth and awareness and curiosity. 

    Albeit the pornographic elements (noise of physical and sexual portrayal of greediness on flesh), the film was pure in intention and purpose. Even without the cops rummaging around radical students, it was able to arouse my understanding on history and capture the quintessence about the last days of Marcos’ military rule - from the crumbling high-rise complex, repressing and claustrophobic atmosphere of the entresuelo, the singular possessiveness of the dwellers on basketball, cats meowing, alcohol, sex and nothing else.

    But what struck me then, and more so now, is the gay character that casually cavorts with his lover in front of everyone. He was shown with neither ridicule nor condescension- just another human being struggling in that same darkness of society’s cruelty and square- mindedness.

    Uncovering of the title’s idea was creatively established when he said these lines,

    “Anong kinalaman ng edad sa sakit ng ulo? Aba! Malapit na pala ang birthday mo. Scorpio ka nga pala kaya ka pala malibog. Scorpio rin ang nakatira sa baba. Makamandag ang Scorpio kaya ingat ka! Baka ikaw ang malason ng kamandag mo!”

    Erik Matti’s rendering of the second film is frankly inventive compared from the first one. Everyone may not be fixated with the sex scenes, yet no one can readily notice the basketball court and what the sport means in the movie. Watching the movie means looking at the hidden nuances. Though the vision was present, the film resembled a two-hour tedious running time and was mildly kinky where the original was harrowingly perverse. You might just call the sequel, Scorpio Lite.Although the story line lacks substance, its actors were superb. Albert Martinez to name was able to portray two different roles apart – from meticulous to dangerous and compulsive.

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