1. So, to not expense my blogger status, I thought of posting a song or a quote a day, and maybe inject my understanding from it.

    Here’s my first one from Akdong Musician (AKMU), a South Korean sibling duo who won the second installment of the K-Pop Star series, with their second title track, “Melted”. This song has helped me become more sensitive to suffering. 

    Watching the story progress to AKMU’s haunting vocals, I sense a universalism in the “unintelligible fates” of the characters–that all must struggle to overcome their solitude. The song did capture the simultaneous adversity and hope as shown in the video.

    I believe we’ve been in the boy’s position at one time. Like how we completely become desperate when we seek affection and when our boldness and obvious inquisitive nature have been criticized. Or when the world has shown us that we’re disposable and inconsequential, and that everything seems to be against us, and we react with instinctual violence.

    I hope that when we witness these tragedies in our lives as the boy does, we see the possibilities for change, and let that change challenge us to overcome sadness, so that we can offer others kindness, connection, and hope.

    video

  2. P’nan Photographers Club celebrates 5th Year Anniversary(An article I did for Focus Weekly, an avantgarde corporate newsmagazine in Northern Luzon)
Pangasinan’s own and Northern Luzon’s sole Federation of Philippine Photographers Foundation (FPPF) accredited club celebrates its 5th anniversary through a public exhibit in SM Rosales. The well thought out exhibition ran from May 25 to 30, revealing some of the most brilliant photos taken by locals, and non-nationals.

Aimed at extending the faculties of its members and inspiring awareness through quality photography, Pangasinan Photographers Club (PaPhoc) opted to go a relatively new direction, albeit the methods evident from previous exhibits, now informed by ideas not limited to Pangasinan.
Joe Malicdem, the present President of the club, says that through joint efforts and supervised collection, the exhibit was made possible. It took the team three months of preparation.
Sana, kahit sa modernisasyong mayroon tayo ngayon ay makuhang lumingon at i-appreciate ng mga tao ang kahit anong uri ng sining. Minsan, mas nakikita natin ‘yung realidad sa mga litrato kesa ‘yung sa telebisyon o sa Internet (I hope despite the modernization and access to technology, people get to see and appreciate any type of art. Every so often, we discern reality through photos more than television and the Internet), expressed by Nick Custodio, a spectator and resident of Barangay Carmen East, Rosales.
Aside from conducting public displays, PaPhoc also gears toward free workshops and outreach programs in help of an unfortunate organization. In 2012, PaPhoc, under the responsibility of Ray Rosario then, delivered community services to Salapingao, Binmaley where they gave slippers and school supplies to underprivileged children.
Knowing the club and its community
PaPhoc is created in 2009 for the upliftment of Philippine photography and the welfare of Pangasinan photographers. It is a non-profit organization that advocates cooperation among photographers—of which the province has more than enough than realized.
By providing the right leadership, PaPhoc has been recognized by the industry as a unifying organization.

In a special Focus Weekly ‘Profiles’ interview, Joe Malicdem, who is known by some as “The One Man Production Photographer” (because he can do it all, from styling to post-production) reflects on the club’s history and future plans.
FOCUS: How did PaPhoc come to light? What was the inspiration behind it?Joe Malicdem: Our club started during the celebration of Bangus Festival 2009, since photographers gather at the time to document the prestigious event. So forming an organization made sense. Our preliminary aim is to improve our skills, be able to share knowledge, and discover things about photography collectively.
F: Who are members of the club?JM: We are composed of shooters who specialized in nature, portrait, still life, fashion, and events photography.  But we don’t limit ourselves when it comes to our strengths. We have members who are effective in graphics, and we also conduct workshops within the club.
F: Since PaPhoc is using surplus revenues, how were you able to maintain it?JM: We pay for our own expenses. We assist each other, from transportation means to food. But when the club decided to mature extensively by producing more workshops, and joining the Federation of Philippine Photographers Foundation (FPPF) for accreditation, we resolved to collecting annual fees.
F: Tell us more about the exhibit (in celebration of PaPhoc’s 5th year anniversary).JM: In our previous exhibits, we focus on showcasing the people, places, and livelihood in the province of Pangasinan. But this year, we recognized photos taken from other parts of the world since we have foreign members.  This will be an exciting chance for everyone to see a large group of diverse original prints.
 F: What can you advise our aspiring photographers out there?JM: Photography is an art of observation. It’s not just how you hold a camera and shoot; it’s the way you see life and everything around you. Take lots of pictures in a variety of different situations. Get out of your comfort zone. And learn to accept criticism and use it to better your work. With experience, you grow. You may also join a club, like I did. I mastered my skills because I listened and paid attention.
F: How do you see PaPhoc in the succeeding years? What are your future plans for the club?JM: We want it grow more. To be able to penetrate the entire region, or the global industry. Also, to do more volunteer missions. 

    P’nan Photographers Club celebrates 5th Year Anniversary
    (An article I did for Focus Weekly, an avantgarde corporate newsmagazine in Northern Luzon)

    Pangasinan’s own and Northern Luzon’s sole Federation of Philippine Photographers Foundation (FPPF) accredited club celebrates its 5th anniversary through a public exhibit in SM Rosales. The well thought out exhibition ran from May 25 to 30, revealing some of the most brilliant photos taken by locals, and non-nationals.

    Aimed at extending the faculties of its members and inspiring awareness through quality photography, Pangasinan Photographers Club (PaPhoc) opted to go a relatively new direction, albeit the methods evident from previous exhibits, now informed by ideas not limited to Pangasinan.

    Joe Malicdem, the present President of the club, says that through joint efforts and supervised collection, the exhibit was made possible. It took the team three months of preparation.

    Sana, kahit sa modernisasyong mayroon tayo ngayon ay makuhang lumingon at i-appreciate ng mga tao ang kahit anong uri ng sining. Minsan, mas nakikita natin ‘yung realidad sa mga litrato kesa ‘yung sa telebisyon o sa Internet (I hope despite the modernization and access to technology, people get to see and appreciate any type of art. Every so often, we discern reality through photos more than television and the Internet), expressed by Nick Custodio, a spectator and resident of Barangay Carmen East, Rosales.

    Aside from conducting public displays, PaPhoc also gears toward free workshops and outreach programs in help of an unfortunate organization. In 2012, PaPhoc, under the responsibility of Ray Rosario then, delivered community services to Salapingao, Binmaley where they gave slippers and school supplies to underprivileged children.

    Knowing the club and its community

    PaPhoc is created in 2009 for the upliftment of Philippine photography and the welfare of Pangasinan photographers. It is a non-profit organization that advocates cooperation among photographers—of which the province has more than enough than realized.

    By providing the right leadership, PaPhoc has been recognized by the industry as a unifying organization.

    In a special Focus Weekly ‘Profiles’ interview, Joe Malicdem, who is known by some as “The One Man Production Photographer” (because he can do it all, from styling to post-production) reflects on the club’s history and future plans.

    FOCUS: How did PaPhoc come to light? What was the inspiration behind it?
    Joe Malicdem: Our club started during the celebration of Bangus Festival 2009, since photographers gather at the time to document the prestigious event. So forming an organization made sense. Our preliminary aim is to improve our skills, be able to share knowledge, and discover things about photography collectively.

    F: Who are members of the club?
    JM: We are composed of shooters who specialized in nature, portrait, still life, fashion, and events photography.  But we don’t limit ourselves when it comes to our strengths. We have members who are effective in graphics, and we also conduct workshops within the club.

    F: Since PaPhoc is using surplus revenues, how were you able to maintain it?
    JM: We pay for our own expenses. We assist each other, from transportation means to food. But when the club decided to mature extensively by producing more workshops, and joining the Federation of Philippine Photographers Foundation (FPPF) for accreditation, we resolved to collecting annual fees.

    F: Tell us more about the exhibit (in celebration of PaPhoc’s 5th year anniversary).
    JM: In our previous exhibits, we focus on showcasing the people, places, and livelihood in the province of Pangasinan. But this year, we recognized photos taken from other parts of the world since we have foreign members.  This will be an exciting chance for everyone to see a large group of diverse original prints.

     F: What can you advise our aspiring photographers out there?
    JM: Photography is an art of observation. It’s not just how you hold a camera and shoot; it’s the way you see life and everything around you. Take lots of pictures in a variety of different situations. Get out of your comfort zone. And learn to accept criticism and use it to better your work. With experience, you grow. You may also join a club, like I did. I mastered my skills because I listened and paid attention.

    F: How do you see PaPhoc in the succeeding years? What are your future plans for the club?
    JM: We want it grow more. To be able to penetrate the entire region, or the global industry. Also, to do more volunteer missions. 

    photo

  3. Finally! A sequel that exceeds its precursor. The now long list of Xmen films offer up a wide range of what is both good and bad about cinema.

I suppose I should have seen this coming. From its restraint marketing campaign up until three weeks ago with a single trailer, scattered context-less photos on the Internet, and film posters.

What we will be in the future is the product of our efforts, actions, and decisions we do today.  This comes to mind as I watched the movie. It may have implied that our decisions matter. The movie was an eye opener. If you’ll look at it in deeper meaning, you’ll see how our mistake affect the future. 

The film is both more progressed but more confounding than its precursor since it requires full attention but it’s equally rewarding.

I immediately got hooked by the blast of fight scenes that shows survival tests for both species across two time periods. And the idea of setting a very high momentum can be quite dangerous but I was amazed that director, Bryan Singer surpassed it until the end. Emotionally, the story, actors, and scenes take you to a place you never thought it could go.

The appealing characters from the original X-Men film trilogy, Wolverine, Mystique, Bolivar Trask, Professor X, Magneto, Rogue, Storm, Blink, Kitty Pryde, Colossus, Beast, Warpath, Iceman, and William Stryker joined forces with their young selves from X-Men: First Class in a great epic battle to change the past and save the dying future.

The mash-up of X-Men past and future for me has the prospective to be the finest superhero blockbuster this generation will ever see. The Xmen sent Wolverine from future to the past in a desperate effort to change history and prevent an event that results in doom for both humans and mutants.

Hugh Jackman, who seems to be the face of the Xmen delivers with his dry sense of humor. Jennifer Lawrence is more a focus in this one which makes sense (she’s the IT girl of today, and makes a lot of money). However, James MaCavoy steals the show as the one and only Professor Charles Xavier with a great performance you’ll never see coming. Not to exclude the rest of the cast, this rivals The Dark Knight franchise with a thriller like mentality that you won’t want to miss on the big screen.

Every element is balanced. Even the soundtrack is fitting. The cinematography in itself was excellent. Over all, it was entertaining and a significant Xmen movie.
I walked away from the film very satisfied but let us hope that this is not the last we see of the Xmen on our screens.

    Finally! A sequel that exceeds its precursor. The now long list of Xmen films offer up a wide range of what is both good and bad about cinema.

    I suppose I should have seen this coming. From its restraint marketing campaign up until three weeks ago with a single trailer, scattered context-less photos on the Internet, and film posters.

    What we will be in the future is the product of our efforts, actions, and decisions we do today.  This comes to mind as I watched the movie. It may have implied that our decisions matter. The movie was an eye opener. If you’ll look at it in deeper meaning, you’ll see how our mistake affect the future.

    The film is both more progressed but more confounding than its precursor since it requires full attention but it’s equally rewarding.

    I immediately got hooked by the blast of fight scenes that shows survival tests for both species across two time periods. And the idea of setting a very high momentum can be quite dangerous but I was amazed that director, Bryan Singer surpassed it until the end. Emotionally, the story, actors, and scenes take you to a place you never thought it could go.

    The appealing characters from the original X-Men film trilogy, Wolverine, Mystique, Bolivar Trask, Professor X, Magneto, Rogue, Storm, Blink, Kitty Pryde, Colossus, Beast, Warpath, Iceman, and William Stryker joined forces with their young selves from X-Men: First Class in a great epic battle to change the past and save the dying future.

    The mash-up of X-Men past and future for me has the prospective to be the finest superhero blockbuster this generation will ever see. The Xmen sent Wolverine from future to the past in a desperate effort to change history and prevent an event that results in doom for both humans and mutants.

    Hugh Jackman, who seems to be the face of the Xmen delivers with his dry sense of humor. Jennifer Lawrence is more a focus in this one which makes sense (she’s the IT girl of today, and makes a lot of money). However, James MaCavoy steals the show as the one and only Professor Charles Xavier with a great performance you’ll never see coming. Not to exclude the rest of the cast, this rivals The Dark Knight franchise with a thriller like mentality that you won’t want to miss on the big screen.

    Every element is balanced. Even the soundtrack is fitting. The cinematography in itself was excellent. Over all, it was entertaining and a significant Xmen movie.

    I walked away from the film very satisfied but let us hope that this is not the last we see of the Xmen on our screens.

    photo

    Jun 29 9:45AM
  4. Baguio Night Market: Not your usual find!(An article I did for Focus Weekly, an avantgarde corporate newsmagazine in Northern Luzon)
The market does not fence itself inside the stalls.  Once the sun retreats, a swirling mob of shoppers is ready to welcome you once you descend through the bitter cold night of Baguio City  from an alley across Session Road—a sort of guerilla-style night market. This is where the real action happens.
Fast Facts: A common observation among Baguio-goers is that most thrift stores close as early as 7:30 pm. To boost the local industry and to cater to more tourists, the City Government of Baguio decided to extend the shopping hours by inaugurating the “Baguio City Night Market”. The program was launched on July 27, 2011.
Considered as the Philippines’ ukay-ukay capital, Baguio is exceeding itself every weekend nights as it lays down an ukay fest along one of its main thoroughfares. The whole block next to Burnham Park’s Melvin Jones Grandstand is filled with nothing but secondhand apparels being sold at dirt cheap prices.
Cheap as they are, you can still bargain with the vendors for a lower price; in fact it is indispensable that you haggle before buying as they tend to rack up the price on your first asking.
Jam-packed with people pushing for space, flipping through armloads of clothes—from jackets to trench coats, sweatshirts, pants, boots, sneakers, bags, and toys can be difficult. 
Aside from the thrift-store apparels, you’ll also find brand new stuff from the wares being peddled across the area: Nike shoe knock-offs; baseball caps; and sandals.
These people milling about are not your usual Juans and Marias. They are true blue fashionistas ferreting for the cheapest deals for added wardrobe collection. It would probably take a passionate ukay lover a few hours to check all the interesting stuff being sold.
Towards the end of the lane, just in front of the Igorot Garden, shoppers can munch on local and well-loved street-food. You can buy sweet corn, barbecue, tokneneng, binatog, isaw, and a whole lot more.

    Baguio Night Market: Not your usual find!
    (An article I did for Focus Weekly, an avantgarde corporate newsmagazine in Northern Luzon)

    The market does not fence itself inside the stalls.  Once the sun retreats, a swirling mob of shoppers is ready to welcome you once you descend through the bitter cold night of Baguio City  from an alley across Session Road—a sort of guerilla-style night market. This is where the real action happens.

    imageFast Facts: A common observation among Baguio-goers is that most thrift stores close as early as 7:30 pm. To boost the local industry and to cater to more tourists, the City Government of Baguio decided to extend the shopping hours by inaugurating the “Baguio City Night Market”. The program was launched on July 27, 2011.

    Considered as the Philippines’ ukay-ukay capital, Baguio is exceeding itself every weekend nights as it lays down an ukay fest along one of its main thoroughfares. The whole block next to Burnham Park’s Melvin Jones Grandstand is filled with nothing but secondhand apparels being sold at dirt cheap prices.

    imageCheap as they are, you can still bargain with the vendors for a lower price; in fact it is indispensable that you haggle before buying as they tend to rack up the price on your first asking.

    Jam-packed with people pushing for space, flipping through armloads of clothes—from jackets to trench coats, sweatshirts, pants, boots, sneakers, bags, and toys can be difficult. 

    imageAside from the thrift-store apparels, you’ll also find brand new stuff from the wares being peddled across the area: Nike shoe knock-offs; baseball caps; and sandals.

    imageThese people milling about are not your usual Juans and Marias. They are true blue fashionistas ferreting for the cheapest deals for added wardrobe collection. It would probably take a passionate ukay lover a few hours to check all the interesting stuff being sold.

    Towards the end of the lane, just in front of the Igorot Garden, shoppers can munch on local and well-loved street-food. You can buy sweet corn, barbecue, tokneneng, binatog, isaw, and a whole lot more.

    photo

    7 notes
  5. Fruit Warrior Smoothies To keep you rehydrated during summer(An article I did for Focus Weekly, an avantgarde corporate newsmagazine in Northern Luzon)
While squirrels in the other side of the planet are working hard gathering acorns for the cold winter ahead, our country is about to experience a longer, drier season. And while Filipinos are typically familiar with the heat, El Nino in 2014 is predicted to behave differently. 
This awakens the survival consciousness, and for travelers, enduring the sweltering solstice hasn’t been easy. Or getting any easier.
If you’re cruising in a hot locale – you may find yourself sweating more than when you lived ashore in air conditioning and losing precious electrolytes in the process. Electrolytes are electrically-charged salts in the body important to maintain voltages across the cell membranes of the heart, muscles, and nerves. Without them, a person becomes imbalanced, and loses energy easily. 
Conditions like a bad bout of sea and decompression sickness or diarrhea can cause one to lose electrolytes. And once the problem begins, it tends to self- perpetuate and becomes serious unless taken action quickly.
The good news is that these concerns can be prevented with rehydration drinks. And more than once, we needed to give our dogs a dose of liquid too as they cope with the same heat as us.
- Common signs that you’ve lost too many electrolytes include:- Extreme fatigue (beyond normal for the activity);- Muscle cramps;- Headache;- Decreased or dark urination;- Immediately breaking liquid intake into sweat;- Difficult appetite; and- Nauseous tummy.
Make your own formula
I just love the versatility of smoothies. I get so bored with the same thing, so it’s nice to have an arsenal of different smoothies to keep things fresh. It’s easy and affordable to make your own rehydration mix, similar to those commercial drink packets which are dubbed unhealthy due to having higher sugar concentrations. And high sugar is not a proper treatment.
Grapefruit - Rich in vitamin C and is a great detoxifier for the liver.
Cucumber - Prevents water retention, promotes a healthy digestive track, packed with bioavailable minerals, vitamins, and electrolytes.
Apple – Source of fiber and vitamin C; helps balance blood sugar levels, boosts digestion, and reduces inflammation.
Virgin Coconut Oil – Coconut oil has antiviral, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. It’s rich in medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) which help boost metabolism and lower the risks of heart disease.
Mango – Rich in vitamin C, fiber, and beta-carotene. It also contains enzymes that help with the breakdown of protein in the body. Sources: Healing Foods: Eat your way to a healthier life, Flora Health
Talk about a super charged meal in a glass! So anytime you need a boost, just think of the end resultS.
The inclusion of a fruit smoothie in your diet lets you absorb nutrients faster into your system due its liquid form. Vitamins can be communicated faster to the body’s systems, diminishing recovery time for muscles.
Smoothies carry both fiber and antioxidants that help flush toxins from the system and protect tissue from free radicals. After a good workout, and even as you start your day, your body needs an influx of fluids and electrolytes to recover what has been lost through your exertion or during the body’s restorative functions while sleeping.

    Fruit Warrior Smoothies
    To keep you rehydrated during summer
    (An article I did for Focus Weekly, an avantgarde corporate newsmagazine in Northern Luzon)

    While squirrels in the other side of the planet are working hard gathering acorns for the cold winter ahead, our country is about to experience a longer, drier season. And while Filipinos are typically familiar with the heat, El Nino in 2014 is predicted to behave differently.

    This awakens the survival consciousness, and for travelers, enduring the sweltering solstice hasn’t been easy. Or getting any easier.

    If you’re cruising in a hot locale – you may find yourself sweating more than when you lived ashore in air conditioning and losing precious electrolytes in the process. Electrolytes are electrically-charged salts in the body important to maintain voltages across the cell membranes of the heart, muscles, and nerves. Without them, a person becomes imbalanced, and loses energy easily.

    Conditions like a bad bout of sea and decompression sickness or diarrhea can cause one to lose electrolytes. And once the problem begins, it tends to self- perpetuate and becomes serious unless taken action quickly.

    The good news is that these concerns can be prevented with rehydration drinks. And more than once, we needed to give our dogs a dose of liquid too as they cope with the same heat as us.

    - Common signs that you’ve lost too many electrolytes include:
    - Extreme fatigue (beyond normal for the activity);
    - Muscle cramps;
    - Headache;
    - Decreased or dark urination;
    - Immediately breaking liquid intake into sweat;
    - Difficult appetite; and
    - Nauseous tummy.

    Make your own formula

    I just love the versatility of smoothies. I get so bored with the same thing, so it’s nice to have an arsenal of different smoothies to keep things fresh. It’s easy and affordable to make your own rehydration mix, similar to those commercial drink packets which are dubbed unhealthy due to having higher sugar concentrations. And high sugar is not a proper treatment.

    Grapefruit - Rich in vitamin C and is a great detoxifier for the liver.

    Cucumber - Prevents water retention, promotes a healthy digestive track, packed with bioavailable minerals, vitamins, and electrolytes.

    Apple – Source of fiber and vitamin C; helps balance blood sugar levels, boosts digestion, and reduces inflammation.

    Virgin Coconut Oil – Coconut oil has antiviral, antifungal, and antibacterial properties. It’s rich in medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) which help boost metabolism and lower the risks of heart disease.

    Mango – Rich in vitamin C, fiber, and beta-carotene. It also contains enzymes that help with the breakdown of protein in the body. Sources: Healing Foods: Eat your way to a healthier life, Flora Health

    Talk about a super charged meal in a glass! So anytime you need a boost, just think of the end resultS.

    The inclusion of a fruit smoothie in your diet lets you absorb nutrients faster into your system due its liquid form. Vitamins can be communicated faster to the body’s systems, diminishing recovery time for muscles.

    Smoothies carry both fiber and antioxidants that help flush toxins from the system and protect tissue from free radicals. After a good workout, and even as you start your day, your body needs an influx of fluids and electrolytes to recover what has been lost through your exertion or during the body’s restorative functions while sleeping.

    photo

    May 30 11:59AM